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What is addiction and what does it mean to you personally
#11
(04-03-2015, 01:10 PM)bigazznugz Wrote: Addiction is a disease. By definition ore at least the n.a a.a way. To me  you have a addiction when you put drugs whatever they may be before work, family and the responsibilities In life. This doors not apply to marijuana cuz that is not addictive, in my eyes anyway.

its not physically addictive but you can end up relying on it and it makes you lazy and unmotivated. i agree with the above, there is a sinister aspect to the twelve steps. Its like a cult of sobriety and a backdoor to religion.
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#12
Addiction, in its strictest sense, means repetition of behaviour derived from a physical or psychological need. The universe is horribly complex, and our little goldfish bowl view is narrow by both physical constraint as well as necessity. Making sense of complexity is a process we call 'simplification', and it is something we are fundamentally hardwired to do. Think about what you are doing right now. You are observing a string of symbols (roughly 26 in English plus a few grammatical objects), parsing those symbols in groups called 'words', grouping the words into 'sentences', sentences into 'paragraphs', 'statements', 'arguments', 'rhetoric' or, perhaps, 'posts'. From this collection of symbols you form a meaning - you turn data into information, and if you can place the information into context, you turn it into knowledge. The knowledge can be directly what is communicated by the symbols, but there can also be subtext - that is you can derive information about information, given that you have previously derived premises and axioms around which you fit new knowledge. This is called meta-data. The combination of these 26 symbols can therefore represent an almost infinite complexity - perhaps, given what we know about subatomic physics, even infinite complexity.

At no point when you started reading this, did you think about having to parse symbols into meaning. Once upon a time you did. When you were learning to read, each letter had to be sounded for form a word. Words had to be consciously combined to form statements. Your brain functions by very quickly adapting to pattern recognition, being able to identify what is important and disregard everything else. And there is a lot of everything else. So, you immediately focused on finding meaning. Your brain disregarded the fact that it is actually looking at hundreds of thousands little lights that form whatever screen you are looking at. It disregarded that those lights are cycled many times a second, and that each light or group of lights form a pixel - the smallest graphical unit a computer can display. That each letter is formed of many pixels. Each pixel has unique numerical, as does each letter. The placing of a word on a screen is dynamic, and is the function of a graphics engine; a form of digital signal processing. The graphics engine takes its input from the Central Processing Unit, which at its most fundamental, is simply capable of adding numbers together at an incredible speed. It disregarded that there is a network of billions of these CPUs all connected, and that it is because of this, that you can read my thoughts.

Our brains are therefore tuned for optimal pattern recognition in order to find signals within the vast noise of the universe. From an evolutionary perspective, this makes a lot of sense. An animal essentially needs one thing for its species to be successful - it must reproduce before it dies. Let's put this simply: surviving and fucking are the two most important instincts for any animal. But here we find something very different from skills such as complex communication. Without any education, knowledge or training, a human will naturally react to perceived danger. Equally, our Texan friends have proved that even without teaching teenagers about sex, they still fuck like teenagers.

The brain is therefore somewhat conflicted. It must retain inherited behaviours that have proven beneficial in the past. Conversely it must be able to adapt to new challenges. In essence, this is temporal. The former is fixed in the past; and behaviour is reactionary. The latter is about the ability to predict the future so as to make the best possible decision as to action. Addiction is getting stuck in a loop between these two functions. It is easy to make a choice that will affect the immediate future beneficially, based on past experience - the brain is simply fixing on a signal amongst the noise. The more the brain fixes on that signal, the more it is amplified, and the harder it is for new information to enter the cycle.

Addiction is behaviour. It is not necessarily negative. It is not necessarily positive. It is however, by any definition, compulsive. Substance addiction is one of the more common addictions, probably accounting for most human beings. While addiction can be relatively harmless - for example, where the substance is in high supply, is socially acceptable and there is no detriment to health, it can also be life destroying - largely where the substance is in controlled supply, is socially unacceptable or it is highly harmful (and one should absolutely ignore the law in this case, as many legal substances are considerably more harmful to health than illegal substances).

Breaking addiction is therefore, as Blodwyn asserts, highly complex, and indeed unique. Understanding the nature of an individual's relationship with an addiction is key to ensuring the well-being of that individual. I do not say that all addictions must be cured, because addiction is implicit in being human. Even with substance addiction, there are cases where individuals are better off being addicted to a substance, than not taking it all.

Opening this area up to debate is of vital importance. This website gets better every day.
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#13


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#14
[12 step programs require you to have faith in a higher power or deity, if you have a problem with that then those programs are not for you.]

I'm a pragmatist. To me addiction is repeated behaviour with significant effects on my overall life or where withdrawal risks overloading the body/mind, e.g. harming overall fitness, making me miss days at work, stopping me from leaving the flat, making me forget birthdays etc.

I've been there with alcohol, using it to numb my brain to allow me to work well into the night. I've been there with stims, where coming off them ended up with me in A&E with respiratory failure. I've been there with benzos which required tapering plus a reinvigorated physical regime to avoid anxiety or sleep dep leading to mania. I think I can safely label myself as an addictive personality. But I've managed to come off everything, sometimes multiple times e.g. in the case of benzos, just sometimes with a lot more pain than expected.


Have you made the effort to listen to your subconscious today? 'Your sake' breakz are as amazing as line times or pin mins.


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#15
If i dream about taking something its usually a subconcious warning and i have dreamt about many drugs in my time. There is no doubt in my mind that some Opiate addicts who time after time relapse might have a better standard of life if given pharma pure Opiates of choice. As for benzos a friend's GP let it slip: There is no money there and they want the way clear for Pregabalin MKII. Paracetamol can be bought for 20p but not heard any moaning from manufacturers there. 28 5mg Actavis Diazepam cost the NHS £3, surely the big firms are making there as have seen kilos of Diazepam from respected firms on sale to those with correct credentials for $170. New research shows low dose benzo prescribing can retain anxiolytic effects for some for 6 months.
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#16
The Benzo police are now in their pomp. Forcing an 83 year old Lady off 1mg of Lorazepam a day ( no problems or complaints with the drug ). She burst into tears when told. Pretty intelligent and knew what was in store. No Dementia despite 30+ years on Lorazepam; No falls etc. Surely She should be allowed Her script and left alone. I think its a national disgrace. This is down to my mates at Addaction. The Doctor should of put Her foot down and said I am not putting a frail old lady through potentially crippling bouts of Insomnia and inability to keep Her independance. Should have been left to live out Her life unless She asked to give it a go. Its now a crusade, those who think it won't affect them might one day reconsider when they need a fast acting muscle relaxant. Are suffering from an extended bout of intractable Insomnia or become so nervous they can't get out. Its all gone too far. Getting a fortnight's Hypnotic is akin to finding a Unicorn Horn in most Urban surgeries yet Lionel Blair has taken a 10mg Diazepam every night for 30 years, bet He isn't on a taper.
Oh where is Blodwyn?
Funny how classification of Gabapentinoids and addiction concerns appeared as if by magic when Pfizer's patents ran out. Gabapentin and Pregabalin are pretty close to Phenibut structurally yet they didn't know? Its blatant, corrupt and I think promises or money were involved be interesting what comes next. I think the next generation of Anxiolytics will have to be based on something utterly different, if there are any. I hear Peptides are being investigated. Whether they prove viable or effective will be another matter. The Russians seem to be way ahead but are so hard to access its hard to know if they are effective.
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#17
Addiction, addiction is what you think gets you out of bed when in reality its the main thing keeping you there. Addiction is the carrot of life meant to dangle temptingly just in front of us, replaced with the carrot flavored candy that rots not just our teeth, but our souls right along with them. For me personally addiction is the main thing that separates the motives that clearly benefit me from the motives that clearly do not. Just when my addictions are within the confines of my self awareness and near fully under my control, the addictions of my brethren laugh hideously as they take my hard earned progress and smash it to dust before my very eyes. Fool that I am I take solace in the ashes of the addiction and like a beautiful phoenix it rises, greater than I. But it is truly terrible to behold once my senses truly grasp what it is that it does to me.
“If someone is able to show me that what I think or do is not right, I will happily change, for I seek the truth, by which no one was ever truly harmed. It is the person who continues in his self-deception and ignorance who is harmed.”
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