• 1 Vote(s) - 2 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5


Tramadol as an antidepressant?!?
#1
Question 
I know tramadol is not a RC, but it's pharmacological uses are being studied for potential use in other illnesses.




There are studies going on such as this one:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15358985  and this :http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17912046 which suggest Tramadol could be used for pain (of course) but also for depression.

Tramadol is a synthetic opioid and fantastic analgesic when used for analgesia, but there are many suggestions of how it also has potential for treating depression and even other illnesses etc. I just wondered what the school of thought on this is. Depression is often triggered by chronic pain, and treatment of pain and depression co morbidly is difficult due to drug interactions and pain types (bone, muscle, neurological etc). 

Yes it's addictive, but so are all opioids, benzos, and antidepressant drugs (physically and psychologically).

It's use in this manner for palliative care would be fantastic provided it offered the patient a suitable level of analgesia too. Like all meds, side effects, dosages etc have to be monitored on an individual patient basis.

In chronic pain, it would have to be closely monitored due to tolerance, which may void it's analgesic properties which may leave the patient requiring another analgesic such as Codeine, and issues with addiction and tolerance. This is one reason that I don't feel it would serve BOTH purposes for some chronic pain patients very well.

In my opinion it would fair better used this way in a palliative care setting if used for both pain and depression, but what do you think?.

If it was used solely for depression/other off label uses, how would it fare along the lines of tolerance and addiction?, bearing in mind commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs are addictive (I believe any drug that cannot be stopped without tapering and withdrawal symptoms to be addictive even if they have no recreational and/or abuse potential).

It'll be interesting to see how the research progresses.

~Stingy Bee
Reply
#2
Definitely interesting. It's an SNRI so it makes sense that if any opioid would be used for depression it'd be tramadol.

You might be interested in this too, OP: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ALKS-5461
Who the fuck is Psychoactive Substances Bill and why is he taking all my drugs?
Reply
#3
Of course there are questions about what the role of SSRIs SNRIs and there effectiveness in many situations is in the first place.
Kratom and other opiod drugs have been used to raise mood and were about the first clinical drugs for mental maladies.
The opiod effects (of tramadol) if relevent to the effect would be a potential problem in terms of tolerance and dependance - ADs can create withdrawal (which doesn’t mean severe) but it certainly isn’t a given; it would depend on dose, duration and the individual drug and with patients with depressive and other conditions there are questions over data relating to WD such as simple return of neurotic symptoms. I think it not unfair to suggest opiod drugs are unlikely not to have some discontinuation effects - it’s not impossible that tramadol WD could involve both if taken long term - it depends on what the u-opiod to SNRI ratio is perhaps. I think you’d want a very clear advantage over current medication. Similarly some antihistamines are reuptake inhibitors for SERT but might not be good candiates for replacing sedative ADs.

Given the range of ADs and difference in pharmacological approaches opening up to depression and other conditions the thing I would ask is what is an antidepressant? There is the idea that they are correcting some supposed or suggested inbalance in brain chemistry - lacking proof of such imbalance what is the difference between ‘antidepressant' and 'mood enhasing’?
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law"
Reply
#4
IMO Id be more than happy to change all my anti depressants to tramadol. But I would also think it is far more addictive and destructive for the body than normal SSRIs or Benzo or etc..
Could be a solution for really really really bad cases of depression but for the long run it would destory your body faster than bezo and other
Reply
#5
Tramadol is a serotinin releasing agent, not reuptake blocker, isn't it?
Reply
#6
all I know about tramadol is its a fecked up opiod, I took them before a felt really weird after them not a proper opoid feeling atall, I think it effects different  opiat receptors,as antidepressant I think it would make more of a headache in the long run.
Reply
#7
(09-03-2016, 12:02 AM)Ozle Wrote: Tramadol is a serotinin releasing agent, not reuptake blocker, isn't it?

It is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor yes. You probably won't notice any effects from this unless you take it daily for at least a month since that's how SNRIs work but it does not release serotonin.
Who the fuck is Psychoactive Substances Bill and why is he taking all my drugs?
Reply
#8
Crikey it would need to be well controlled, its a dirty dam addictive drug thats killed a lot of people. Ive heard that ketamine is being used also for treating depression.

Seizures happen with tramadol if not carefull. Exercise if you still have your legs and arms and good nutrition is the best cure and thats a scientific fact.

But yeah the future hopefully spawns new drugs that are safe if you cant be bothered getting up off your arse. I hope so. Darn we will probably miss out. David Nutt hopefully will create something. He already has with his valium like alcohol pill/drink which also has an antidote. 

I made a post there recently but apparently mega dosing Vitamin C via Sodium Acrobate can help with depression and the hell which comes from opiate withdrawal and Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome whether it be from drugs or natural events. There is a lot of study information on the net about it. 

There are also studies on Kratom for depression but that stuff can make you depressed. Pfizer the evil giants who created Lyrica are studying it. I abused Lyrica, it nearly killed me. Stay away from it.
Reply
#9
Tramadol is structurally related to the SNRI venlafaxine/Effexor, which is known to have the worst withdrawal symptoms of the antidepressants. Double the fun I guess... if brain zaps, fever, and exploding head syndrome are what you're in to.
Reply
#10
I have taken tramadol and venlafaxine both long term and can say that they are very similar with regards to working for depression. The tramadol seems to work a few hours after starting them where as the venlafaxine takes over a week before you notice.

I can't see tramadol being prescribed off label for depression by doctors in the UK.
Reply

Reddit   Facebook   Twitter  




Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

   
DISCLAIMER
Any views or opinions posted by members are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the UKCR staff team.