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The Story of Spice, the Street Drug That's Not Going Away
#1
Quote:The users of Drugs Forum were intrigued. One Thursday in August of 2006, a man going by the name of Thirdedge logged onto the website that for more than 15 years has provided users of psychedelics with a place to share their experiences. Thirdedge had been experimenting with Spice – a new "legal high" marketed as an alternative to cannabis. "It seems to be the only one of these type of products that is really effective," he wrote.

At the time, legal highs had a reputation for uselessness. In particular, the herbal blends sold as marijuana substitutes offered users little more than a possible placebo effect and a head rush from any tobacco with which they were smoked. Spice was different.

Thirdedge wanted answers. The listed ingredients on the packet – plants with names such as Blue Lotus, Indian Warrior, Dwarf Skullcap and Siberian Motherwort – were not previously known to produce psychedelic effects. Thirdedge proposed two theories. "One or a combination of the above ingredients is a DECENT cannabis alternative," he wrote. "Alternatively the product could be mislabeled and contain something completely different?"

Such speculation did little to dampen enthusiasm for Spice. Positive reviews flooded in. One user said Spice was "even more trippy" and "lasted even longer" than marijuana. Another wrote: "Spice is like skunk without the bad bits." It hardly seemed to matter that nobody knew why. All anyone knew for sure was that Spice worked.

It would be more than two years before researchers in Germany discovered the truth. The active ingredient in Spice was synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 – a chemical compound designed to replicate the effects of marijuana. Spice was no herbal high, but a potent new designer drug.

The authorities moved quickly to ban Spice, but their efforts did little to stop the drug's spread. While some producers stopped trading, others had alternative compounds ready and waiting. A game of cat and mouse ensued, with manufacturers responding to each successive ban by launching new drugs that remained within the law. A pattern soon emerged, whereby the effects of the drugs became further and further removed from those of the original product.

Just over ten years since it first emerged, Spice is seen as one of the greatest drugs threats facing the UK. It has been described as a "blitzkrieg" upon the homeless population and is being linked to an increasing number of deaths. It is a major factor in a crisis engulfing the prison system. Drugs workers have described it as "worse than heroin". In recent weeks, videos have emerged of users stood motionless in town and city centres, prompting tabloids to warn of a Spice epidemic and decry the terrifying effects of this so-called "zombie" drug.

FULL ARTICLE: https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/the-s...going-away
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#2
Thanks for that.

As long as they don't decriminalize the "original", this was almost bound to happen. And so we see how drug policies driven by prohibition rather than harm reduction actually worsen the situation.

We live in a sorry world.
'Why can't I be different and original
Like everybody else?'
(Vivian Stanshall)
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#3
Yeah, it's completely backwards. I think so of the law makers mean well but they live in a dream land..

..I always find it strange that people with no first hand experience of drugs (or anything/subject) het to decide what we can and can't do/take/etc.

It makes no sense at al.. and using addicts and worst case scenarios to base it all on is simply crazy. I'm certain there are many more people who use drugs (especially cannabis) responsibly without it/them ever causing any issues. Hell I even know people that use heroin on a regular basis and you would never tell.. and they have the money and job/s to support it. Crazy old world.. and even crazier generation above us who are completely stuck in the dark ages. For they not know what they do..

..fools.
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#4
I know that with prohibitions it's difficult to know, but is anyone aware of the 'noids typically being used in blends these days?

I'm guessing from the overdoses and zombifications that it's MMB/MDMB CHIMXX and above?
"The depth of research that binds the pages together is amazing and enlightening to all but the most intellectual of readers. It's a light hearted read, but dark and brooding. Recommended for anyone ready to get their teeth into something tasty."
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#5
I think you are most likely right there mate.. I mean if people were to stock up on anything in bulk before the PSA for such a venture it would make sense to buy the stronger ones...
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#6
(07-05-2017, 04:54 PM)Tails Wrote: ..I always find it strange that people with no first hand experience of drugs (or anything/subject) het to decide what we can and can't do/take/etc.

It makes no sense at all.. and using addicts and worst case scenarios to base it all on is simply crazy. I'm certain there are many more people who use drugs (especially cannabis) responsibly without it/them ever causing any issues.

I turned 57 last week. I realized that Christmas last year marked the 40th anniversary of the beginning of my cannabis use and the 30th anniversary of my almost daily use.

I'm still here, happy, not crazy, have a decent job and 3 happy, non-drug-taking adult children who all have better jobs than me. The only difficult times I had were in my 30s when I was mixing it with alcohol which I gave up in 2002.

I'm still looking for what I might have done wrong and why the authorities in most countries have spent so much time, money and resources on fighting such a basically benevolent plant.
'Why can't I be different and original
Like everybody else?'
(Vivian Stanshall)
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#7
Well if it was actually based on harms, and worst case results, alcohol and tobacco would be illegal too. The 'historical reasons' for their legality argument simply doesn't hold water.

I can't see what more evidence is needed for the relative safety of an intoxicant than thousands of years use without any fatalities.

I do think though that cannabis, especially the stronger varieties, need to be kept away from young people. It does nothing for motivation and if you're in your teens, you need motivation in order to explore your options and fully develop into what you can be. Paradoxically, it is precisely these young people who in the current situation are most easily able to acquire it. By criminalising the weed, a situation is created where it's use is secretive and taboo, thereby depriving them of the ability to discuss its use and receive proper guidance. And a criminal record certainly causes more harm to a life than cannabis ever could. Not only is the current situation misguided, it also makes no sense with regards to its stated aims.

I can see no issues, either in terms of individual harms nor societal damage in the larger sense, with allowing an adult to enjoy a joint. It's faster-working and less damaging to health than a couple of straight gins and a cigarette after a hard day's work.

But as long as we have the usual middle-english moral hysteria fogging these issues, the population at large will continue to be patronised by those who claim to have their interests at heart without even beginning to understand the situation, nor trying to follow their own shallow arguments to a logical conclusion.
"The depth of research that binds the pages together is amazing and enlightening to all but the most intellectual of readers. It's a light hearted read, but dark and brooding. Recommended for anyone ready to get their teeth into something tasty."
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#8
(07-05-2017, 06:00 PM)2Corinth13:1 Wrote: I know that with prohibitions it's difficult to know, but is anyone aware of the 'noids typically being used in blends these days?

I'm guessing from the overdoses and zombifications that it's MMB/MDMB CHIMXX and above?

Based on recent Wedinos analyses it appears to mostly be 5F-MDMB-PINACA and AMB-FUBINACA.
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#9
is AMB-FUBINACA really as much more potent than MDMB-CHMICA(MMB-CHMINACA) as people say? never touched the sides for me!! and now I'm 100% clean of noids for the first time in years, NPS achieved something good i guess....
Peace

SlowandFastandSlow
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#10
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-39969980...ne-year-on
"The depth of research that binds the pages together is amazing and enlightening to all but the most intellectual of readers. It's a light hearted read, but dark and brooding. Recommended for anyone ready to get their teeth into something tasty."
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