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Kefir, Tibicos and Kombucha Probiotics.
#1
Kefir generally refers to a kind of runny sour yogurt made from white 'grains'. It is grown in organic milk.

Kombucha is a slimy rubbery more fungal thing that looks a bit like that cap of stuff that forms on the surface of left over pints of beer in student houses. It is grown in a black tea solution.

Tobicos, or water kefir, are transparent 'crystals' which some say originated from a cactus pulp in South America. It is grown in sugary water.

All three of these are symbiotic cultures of bacteria and yeasts (scoby) alleged to be beneficial to our health. You can buy starter cultures online for a couple of quid, or grab some from friendly enthusiasts, who are invariably more than happy to spread their weird behavior to other people.

I prefer tobicos as its ready in 24 hours and virtually maintenance-free. I add pineapple juice and some shavings from one of those solid blocks of coconut cream to make a drink that's very nice indeed. Ginger and lemon are nice additives too.  I find kombucha too much like vinegar and milk kefir too active in the old large intestine, though many folk do swear by these two.

Be aware that kombucha people tend to be a little odd though. They're usually rock-wafters or yogurt-weavers. So if you're getting a starter from one of them make sure you don't get stuck in a corner when you're collecting it and lie about where you live.

Why am I telling you this, you must surely have wondered by now. Well, I've always been very suspicious of anything that's sold as a cure-all, or that claims to fix a wide spectrum of ailments. But I have to say that, apart from tasting delicious, I have also noticed a surprising mood-boost from drinking a cupful of tobicos over the last few months. It's not something you want to down gallons of, since it is, after all, a bacterial culture. But in small quantities before a meal it certainly aids digestion and as I say appears to be able to put a smile on my face.

I had wondered how this could be the case and set about trying to find evidence for the supposed benefits. In among the unsubstantiated claims and professions of medical miracles, I stumbled across this study.

It would appear, if the study is correct, that our intestinal flora and fauna are rather more influential in our everyday mood that may at first be supposed. They are able to affect serotonin, GABA and dopamine levels as well as influence the CNS via other mechanisms. I shan't go into more detail as the study is linked above.

I'd recommend trying one or more of these probiotics if you fancy the idea, if only to make a nice drink. And if you're currently buying those fancy yogurts aiming at similar effects you can save cash too.
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#2
Excuse the off-topic, but I now have rock-wafting and yoghurt-weaving to add to my hobbies, alongside ant-discrediting (you really don't know what you started with that one!)
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#3
The next part of the project was to somehow tag the original ant and repeatedly discredit it until it got expelled from the nest and began wandering alone in the wilderness developing super-powers. Then after doing this in multiple nests, collect the despairing, lone ants together into a team like Professor X does with the X-Men. X-Ants. Then you raid the original nests and enslave the inhabitants and launch an attack on humanity and take over the world.

Another one is toad-stacking. You can see a simple three toad stack here. Once the stack reaches six or seven it starts to bend sideways like a slinky because toads are fundamentally convex. So you have to support them with a channel of bent cardboard. This way you can get a twenty one toad stack which can, in theory, be bent over into a self-supporting arch.

It hasn't been done yet as far as we know. Some people think you'd need a larger key-toad in the centre.
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