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Jujube or Chinese Date a promising anxiolytic and sedative.
#1
Been reading about this and there are a few papers confirming its effectiveness as an Anxiolytic and mild sedative. GABA seems not to be involved and indirect Glutamate receptor modulation is seen as the most likely main mechanism of action. Have ordered some, has anyone tried it?
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#2
Totalky unrelated but i see that baiclain has actually b3en picked up by a big vendor. Im not sure exzlactly what irlts used for l. Is said to have anxiolytic properties
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baicalin
love the world and it will love you back. chin
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#3
It sounds interesting, but how much would you have to take in order to feel anything? There are some extracts on eBay but no reviews whatsoever.
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#4
Swanson do standardised capsules at 250mg so assuming that or 2x that is deemed effective - found reviews on their site and amazon totalling 21 and going back nearly a decade; you can probably track down others; a range from helped me relax/sleep to does nothing; more positive than negative.
Examine.com seems a reasonable overview unless there is something newer; studies as ever are very limited in scope; one combined with suboptimal phenobarbitol another suggesting synergy with 5HTP (which I and the GF have found seemingly helpful for sleep but I offer that as anecdotal and carry no weight above other reviews of 5HTP) Think like any supplement one would have to assume this very mild and not universally effective


2.2. Anxiety
The seeds of Ziziphus jujube have been implicated in reducing anxiety, in accordance with their traditional usage.[30] Oral administration of 0.5, 1, and 2g/kg of the ethanolic seed extract in mice was able to exert anxiolytic effects, and although it was equally effective as Buspirone and Diazepam (2mg/kg and 1mg/kg, respectively) at a black and white test (anxiety model[31]) at 500mg/kg, it appeared to become less potent at anxiolysis at 1 and 2g/kg while becoming more sedative in nature.[30]
Quote:Possible anxiolytic effects that rival Buspirone and Diazepam according to one study, lack of evidence otherwise; subsequently higher doses reduce anxiolysis in favor of sedation

2.3. Sedation
According to one systemic review on insomnia, the Traditional Chinese Medicine called Suan Zao Ren(which is Ziziphus Jujuba) appears to be the most commonly used insomniac treatment; conclusions on its efficacy in humans could not be drawn due to a lack of good evidence, however.[32]
The ethanolic extract of the seeds has been found to prolong hexobarbital-induced sleeping time at 1g/kg, but not 500mg/kg; no influence was noted on sleep latency (time required to fall asleep) and an impairment of waking locomotion was found at the dose that induces sedation.[30] This enhancement of sedation may be mediated via the flavonoid spinosin and vicariously through post-synaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors (serotonin receptor), with synergistic augmentation when paired with 5-HT1A antagonists at 15mg/kg spinosin.[33] This enhancement has also been noted with jujubosides, and was synergstic with 5-HTP at 2mg/kg.[34]
In a test on what constituents mediated these effects, the saponins and flavanoids (but not polysaccharides) appeared to have anti-locomotion properties but only the saponin component appeared to augment phenobarbitol-induced sleep.[35] At a dose of phenobarbitol that was seen as suboptimal (able to induce sleep in a minority of animals), the amount of animals who managed to sleep increased from 20% to 90% with the saponins (70% with flavonoids).[35]
Quote:Highly regarded as a sedative in Traditional Chinese Medicine with minimal Western trials on its efficacy, it appears to induce sedation in a relatively dose dependent manner and is synergistic with 5-HTP in this regard
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law"
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#5
The thing with Herbal remedies is to find one ( if any ) that's effective for you. Passiflora has given me good results and one particular Resinous extract was very effective indeed if smoked but I have also had noticeable effects from capsules of powdered aerial parts albeit at double the recommended dose. If you live in N. England northwards freshly collected Wild lettuce latex: It must be fresh and is obtained by scoring the stem to collect the Latex over a few days. This can be vaped and member on here reported surprising levels of sedation. The Victorians used it when Poppy head tea was banned and many found it a decent replacement. The thought of Genteel Victorian Ladies drinking Poopy tea with the Vicar at Garden parties and having a little afternoon nap always tickles me, no mention of harmful or addictive effects were noted by the way. Many thousands of Laudanum users must of been quite Ill for a week or so but with nothing mentioned in the media, they probably thought a 'bug' was going round.
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#6
Yes the wild lettuce is a curious one; never tried it though - didn't know about its use in the Victorian era but no surprise I guess; being mildly smashed has a long history before anyone got all in a tizzy over it. As for the vicar no great deal. Of course everyone from kids up drank beer way back and monks brewed beer; and actually organised great village wide week long benders as I recall to get funds. 

I am being skeptical about placebo effects and so on but certainly not outright distrusting anything and await results. Not had huge luck with most herbs though swear by ginger for nausea - most are mild, highly active ones like poppy/digitalis are banned or medicalised. NHS still prescribes peppermint oil (colpermin) - it didn't help me but if you can treat things with the mildest thing possible it's no bad thing. I can't point to real evidence for 5HTP beyond experience but of course that's botanically sourced.
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law"
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#7
Jujube arrived. Got to say the most pleasant tasting herbal ever, not surprised the Fruit is used to flavour candy and Ice cream in China. 3.5 G of the extract had a definite hypnotic effect that in no way could be put down to placebo. A distinctive type of sedation too. Suspect like most Sedatives overuse will stop it being effective but I am happy to have another tool in the sleep shed for occasional use and its downright lovely tasting, like Peach herbal tea. Overall very happy.
Suppose I should invest in some 5HTP to get the full benefits and will report back when I try the combination but defo one of the more promising traditional remedies I have tried.
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#8
Interesting report. I think Chinese medicine generally, whilst there are certain aspects that aren't much more than sympathetic magic, is nevertheless a pretty rich vein for exploration.

I'd also confirm the wild/wall lettuce activity personally, chased in the field whilst fresh. The mature latex seems to become inactive. Oxidation?

Blue, didn't spot your ROA there. You mention 3.5 grams and compare it to tea, so am assuming you didn't insufflate thumbup
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#9
Cool you got such positive results ; kind of interested to taste it too. 5HTPs always seemed to help when I have taken it where as melatonin it was a lot less clear (not really a sedative) and had to be gauged over a period.
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law"
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#10
I also tried the extract (Swanson's) and so far it seems to be working as an anxiolytic at low doses (250-500mg). I'd say it's quite possible that it could work as a sedative at higher doses, but I haven't explored that possibility so far. I was feeling slightly anxious earlier this afternoon and it worked just as well as a benzo without any sedation or other unwanted side effects. Placebo effect? I don't think so, but I'll have to do more testing before I can be absolutely sure that's not the case here.
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