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Drug that resets tolerance for all drugs : stims,opiates,benzo,etc
#21
But can tolerance really be reversed?

If there is a proven technique which can reverse tolerance and restore the effect of opiates to their original effectiveness I expect many people taking long-term medication for chronic pain would very dearly like to know exactly how this can be done.

So does anyone know the answer to my question?
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#22
(11-04-2016, 07:08 PM)Mazzy Wrote: But can tolerance really be reversed?

If there is a proven technique which can reverse tolerance and restore the effect of opiates to their original effectiveness I expect many people taking long-term medication for chronic pain would very dearly like to know exactly how this can be done.

So does anyone know the answer to my question?
When i have time i will update my nmda antagonist thread, also low daily doses of ibogaine would reverse tolerance to many drugs but its dangerous to take stims at the same time due to its cardiotoxic propertys.
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#23
(15-04-2016, 05:23 AM)Alias22 Wrote:
(11-04-2016, 07:08 PM)Mazzy Wrote: But can tolerance really be reversed?

If there is a proven technique which can reverse tolerance and restore the effect of opiates to their original effectiveness I expect many people taking long-term medication for chronic pain would very dearly like to know exactly how this can be done.

So does anyone know the answer to my question?
When i have time i will update my nmda antagonist thread, also low daily doses of ibogaine would reverse tolerance to many drugs but its dangerous to take stims at the same time due to its cardiotoxic propertys.

Thanks, I'm very much looking forward to your update, have already ordered some memantine.
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#24
NMDA agonists effectively reverse opiate tolerance to some degre, d isomer of methadone is a nmda agonist so therefore methadone is the best option for longterm substitution, you can be on the same dose of methadone for years, DL methadone thats is, levo m is a pure u opioid agonist
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#25
The ability of NMDA antagonists to reverse or reduce tolerance to drugs should be of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

I can envisage a future where drugs such as benzos and opiates are combined with NMDA antagonists to render them more effective and safer, especially for those who have a medical need for long term treatment with these types of drugs. Such people would be protected from tolerance and even addiction.

NMDA antagionists could breathe new life into many old drugs which, although very effective, have currently earned a bad reputation for long term use.

I hope that researchers in pharmaceuticals are looking into this.

(18-03-2016, 01:54 AM)niflheim Wrote:
(17-03-2016, 11:00 PM)Hanns Moleman Wrote: Memantine is said to reverse stimulant tolerance very well.

Ibogaine, by all accounts, works very well and Ibogaine therapy is used for people hopelessly addicted to heroin and other opiates but it's quite heavy stuff and definitely not something you'd want to take to reduce tolerance.

Also the stress hormone cortisol can be effectively reduced by the nootropic phosphatidylserine.  I recently bought some from Powder City and it does seem to make me more relaxed physically but not to the same extent as your run of the mill RC benzo.

The idea that NMDA antagonists like memantine reverse stimulant tolerance is a myth. There's some evidence that using NMDA antagonists alongside stimulants can slow or prevent tolerance increasing, but no evidence, as far as I know, that it can reverse existing tolerance.
There is a wealth of anecdotal evidence on Bluelight that memantine can indeed reverse tolerance to all manner of drugs.

There is also a good collection of research papers that support the view that tolerance can be reversed for some drugs.

http://www.bluelight.org/vb/threads/5018...al-reports

Here is a good research paper that concludes that NMDA antagonists really can reverse tolerance, in this case to morphine.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10763858
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#26
NMDA antagonists are also associated with a decrease in memory and learning at therapeutic doses, including memantine. It's worth being aware of this - the positives (i.e. the effects you want) may outweigh the negatives (the effects you don't want) for some people and that's an individual decision, but there's certainly potential downsides to take into account when considering these kinds of substances.
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#27
(26-04-2016, 07:05 PM)niflheim Wrote: NMDA antagonists are also associated with a decrease in memory and learning at therapeutic doses, including memantine. It's worth being aware of this - the positives (i.e. the effects you want) may outweigh the negatives (the effects you don't want) for some people and that's an individual decision, but there's certainly potential downsides to take into account when considering these kinds of substances.

I agree that there are downsides, many users of memantine report cognitive impairment and "brain fog", it's also possible that some of these effects are semi-permanent when memantine is used long-term. (Pretty ironic for a drug originally designed to treat dementia and Alzheimers)

Someone with severe chronic pain who needs to reduce their tolerance to their opiate painkillers might find the risk worth it if they can get better pain relief.

Someone on a long term prescription of benzos for an anxiety disorder who wants to reduce their tolerance might also be prepared to take the risks in exchange for more effective anxiolysis.

Recreational drug users might be less inclined to take the risks; after all, a period of abstinence is usually sufficient to reduce tolerance and this is obviously the healthier, safer option.
The previous two examples do not have this option.
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#28
would memantine work for tianeptine?
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#29
A flood dose of ibogaine (ibogaine with two other alkaloids, so one step away in the process from iboga root bark to ibogaine) along with a month or so of macrodosing iboga root definitely reduced my tolerance for benzos and helped me withdraw (slowly I might add) with fewer issues (I imagine, although maybe I was just lucky). It also helped me understand why addiction was so prevalent in my life and left me with a deeper understanding about the roots of the deeper problem and how to begin to deal with it. I can only speak from experience here, but that's what it did for me.
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#30
(27-04-2016, 08:19 PM)dudey Wrote: would memantine work for tianeptine?

It's not a very powerful NDMA antagonist and like niflheim said, it comes with its own problems. DXM is more efficient and easily obtainable. Depending on the severity of your tolerance you might be able to cope with actual healthy NDMA antagonists like magnesium and agmatine.
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