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Can anyne reccomed me any good Jungle?
#1
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Get guy, iv been listening to DnB for around 5 years religiously, i frist got into it with the Liquicity stuff and fell in love with the melodys of Liquid DnB, then i slowly moved onto the harder stuff like Jump UP and love that too, but all the jungle iv heard just sounds like total shit

Links would be much appreciated
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#2
What are you talking about? What's your idea of 'jungle'? It's all jungle isn't it? Jungle is/was a term that is interchangeable with dnb, they're the same thing to me.

Do you mean like ragga jungle or what? 1992-1995 stuff? Jungle tekno?

If you're talking about the early stuff you have to remember it was a brand new genre made by young guys with much more basic technology than is available now. Most of it was much less slickly produced than modern dnb.

I hate all this pigeon holing, describe what you want better & I'll find you a good tune.



















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#3


"To fall in hell or soar angelic you need a pinch of psychedelic".
Humphry Osmond to Aldous Huxley (in a book)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxGqcCeV3qk
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#4



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JdTwbvm...E&index=11
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#5
Thank you! Sorry, coming from a Heavy Metal background i thought jungle was it's own separate  genre lol, thats exactly i was looking for Passiflora!





I still think i prefer the more "Modern" sounding DnB like this

Just noticed i made two spelling mistakes in the title :P sorry i was a bit out of it
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#6
Fast jungle Music By Hospital Records would be a good place to start!

https://www.hospitalrecords.com/podcast/...c-special/
I'm The Dude, Playing The Dude, Disguised As Another Dude!
I'm Just A Dude Who's Gone Alittle CrAzY!!!! MUCH LOVE
MY D&B THREAD https://www.ukchemicalresearch.org/Threa...ated-daily
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#7
I actually own High Contrast - Tough Guys Dont Dance, its fucking awesome
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#8




























https://www.facebook.com/groups/195082833944478
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#9
jungle started being used around 93 / 94 and summer '94 was the height of the scene...

i will never forget carnival 94 being out of it on speed and everybody dancing half time to jungle in the sunshine... girls wearing batty riders and pum pum shorts...

 if you think it sounds good now, imagine how that sounded to us back then...

it was like the whole world was looking at london saying wtf? some people couldnt dance to it because the breaks seemed too fast and complex... it put the UK back on the musical map... we had a new scene that everyone was talking about...

lots of terms were used at the time to identify the different styles around 94 / 95... hardstep, intelligence, jump up etc... it always gets a bit out of hand and there is always an element of snobbery and inverted snobbery and efforts by some quarters to keep people out while other elements try to bring people in...

it soon turned to DnB which was around the time bukem started getting media attention and the style changed (as said above) as production improved and equipment changed... the tempo increased with time which left less time for the music to happen and inevitably the original essence got lost somewhere along the way...

in 1994 I was what the music press would have described as a "junglist" but by 98 / 99 i was out of there... the scene was by then all about "darkness" and "tekstep" and it meant nothing to me... the ronnie size album gave it a kick but not for long...

i got back into it again a little bit during the liquid era but not for long...

some of my favourite tracks from the jungle era...









I would go as far to say that this is my favourite...





or maybe this is...




Blankets screw you up. Just say no.
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#10




























I was a young kid when a lot of this stuff came out. Born in 1981. I liked some of the dance tunes that carted in the late 80s, MARRS Pump Up The Volume (my second ever single record), KLF, but I obviously wasn't into any scene at 7 years old. In 1992 I found some pirate radio stations & loved it, they'd play hardcore, techno, ragga, house & garage. I got into hardcore just as it split up to darkside (which later became Jungle) & happy hardcore. A lot of the jungle dnb tunes around before the end of 1993 were pretty basic, experimental & rough sounding. By 1995 it was serious & going mainstream, Goldie's Timeless CD was at the top of the charges (still epic 20 years on), AWOL was a big night at Ministry of Sound & they had merch in every record shop, Metalheadz got going, things were going good.

It was always Jungle drum n bass then, the terms were interchangeable. Then sometime around 1995 LTJ Bukem & a few similar producers coined the snobbish term "intelligent drum n bass" for their slower jazzier style that was harder to dance to, as if they were calling people who liked energetic jump up jungle were a bit thick or something. By 1997 it was back to harder dancefloor stuff that people weren't ashamed to call Jungle, but drum n bass was still the more popular term. After Stevie Hyper died (1998?) drum n bass was by far the most popular term. I'm still sure it's just different terms for the same music genre, but some people like to pigeon hole stuff & make up subgenres, so some people just think pre-1995 stuff was jungle, or tunes with ragga samples in or fast chopped up amen breaks or whatever. Both terms were used for the same thing, often in the same sentence pre-1995, Jungle was the most popular term, then the snobbier "drum n bass" became the more popular term.

At 16 I was old enough to get into clubs (they didn't care so much about underage then), so I really got into it then in 1997-1999. I tried house nights, but house was already getting boring & stale, drum n bass was where the creative stuff was.

Here are some of the tunes from when i first started going raving













Damn auto-correct & etizolam, hope you can read that because I can't edit it. Charts!



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