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Butyr-Fentnyl!? Is crazy strong...
#1
All I can say is WOW... I am on 100mg of methadone daily and have been for 2 3/4 years so I haven't never felt any kind of opioid Euphoria for a very long time due to the Methadone blocking power.

but when I tried Bu-Fentanyl it gave me such an intense opioid rush that I had never felt before in my life.

I dosed my daily synthetic opioid blocker this morning at around 9:15am which is enough to block basically any type of Semi-Synthetic Opioid or Opiate for example:

Codeine
Morphine
Oxycodone
Hydrocodone
Hydromorphone
Heroin(Black Tar Heroin)
Oxymorphone
Fu-Fentanyl

I IVed around 15mg-20mg of Bu-Fentanyl that was cut with Mannitol to make dosing easier to manage and it was the most intense opioid rush I have ever felt in my life.

The second closest being insufflating 35mg of a 40mg Opana ER(Oxymorphone) with the time release scraped off with a razor blade and at the time I had a much lower tolerance of 100mg of Hydrocodone per dose(300mg Hydrocodone daily). 

For the UK people that aren't too familiar with Hydrocodone its about 1/2 the strength of Oxycodone.


Bu-Fentanyl is extremely strong for those who have not tried it and the kind I used was not pure it was cut with Mannitol and I have no idea what is the ratio of bu-f to mannitol


Be extremely careful, after my rush I went to go get some tissue and a piece of tape to cover the injection site and i ended up nodding out in a different room with no tissue or tape then waking up 30 minutes and after that I was just extremely drowsy since (6 hours later).
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#2
fent analogues are gnarly.  I wouldn't ever risk a pre-mixed drug that potent tbh, if there's a dense pooled area in that powder you're dead.  I'd feel better making a solution at the mg/ml i wanted.

that being said, heard this is more useful and less feindish than u-47700.
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#3
Wouldn't it be safer just to smoke smack if you had no tolerance at all to opiates? Imagine all the people who are going to OD of these in the next few years because they heard it's like an RC heroin
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#4
Yes the fentanyl analogues along with fentanyl itself are what is causing half the smack ODs these days. Dealers cut smack with fent and people die from it. Very dangerous shit.

Then there's W-18, a synthetic opioid 100x more potent than fentanyl which has also found its way into cuts most notably in Canada.

Dangerous time to be a smackhead right now.
Who the fuck is Psychoactive Substances Bill and why is he taking all my drugs?
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#5
Interesting WAS - didn’t know it had reached such proportions - that is understandable but pretty poor - the law has done everything to make a drug that it is possible to do relatively safely as bad as possible. What a good time to ban Kratom for some of those wishing to maintain at a low level or reduce. Admittedly there are maintainence programs with methadone (if you fancy something worse than heroin but at least measured out and legal) but the fact is until they prescribe heroin to addicts they will tend to seek it out and I would be surprised if exposure to fentanyls in some cases raises tolerance (lots of parameters so just a guess)
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law"
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#6
Just to note that butyr-fentanyl is (as with most fentanyl derivatives) a class A drug in the UK due to the fentanyl generic clause that captures N-acyl derivatives. There seems to be some confusion among the authorities and the media as to the legality of this class of drugs - see this recent story from the Manchester Evening News for example, but similarly inaccurate stories have appeared in various national newspapers over the last two years. More than one coroner has informed the Home Office that they urgently need to deal with a 'legal high' that's actually been illegal since 1987. So having information here that highlights the risks is useful.
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