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Black Seed Oil (Nigella sativa)
#1
Well overdue for a dedicated thread for this stuff.

I'm using this as a general tonic and pick-me-up, around a teaspoon a day. It appears to be cleansing and generally makes me feel good, but the main area I've found this useful is in ostensibly keeping keeping/raising testosterone levels after an ostarine cycle.

There is some experimental support for these functions.

Anyone else finding this useful, presumably this is more popular in the eastern world due to the prophet's recommendation?
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#2
(12-05-2016, 10:14 AM)ImaginayFortnight Wrote: Well overdue for a dedicated thread for this stuff.

I'm using this as a general tonic and pick-me-up, around a teaspoon a day. It appears to be cleansing and generally makes me feel good, but the main area I've found this useful is in ostensibly keeping keeping/raising testosterone levels after an ostarine cycle.

There is some experimental support for these functions.

Anyone else finding this useful, presumably this is more popular in the eastern world due to the prophet's recommendation?

I was unaware of it's properties for anything other than people saying it helps kratom withdrawal. Since kratom blunts the T (in my research) I thought this might do as well, but you're saying not? As I get older I'm more interested in this topic as I'm finding I lose my drive a bit. Would you say it's helpful for libido?
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#3
It shows extensive protective properties of pretty much all kinds, in many cases surpassing current prescription drugs.

Examine data here

Regarding testosterone, it most certainly isn't suppressive, but doesn't appear to me to be capable of raising levels above normal, only resetting after something suppressive, like too long on ostarine. I didn't notice any libido boost but I'm generally horny enough to shag a cigarette burn so any effect would be obscured personally.

It is proven against stomach ulcers (once they discovered ulcers are caused by bacteria - an Aussie discovery I believe) and is beneficial to liver and kidney health.

I'm honestly surprised it's not more widely used. Combined with milk thistle, it's an extremely cheap protective tonic that sorts your innards out for weeks at pennies a dose.
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#4
Very interesting thanks for the link and recommendations. Not sure how old you are but if your T is maximal already it is probably hard to notice(man do I miss that feeling).

I have only seen it mentioned here and there, never for sale. I'll look into it.
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#5
Ok interesting - I have been using N.sativa for years as a culinary item as “kalongi’/‘onion seed’(looks similar) essential in Indian cooking - oft found in breads and as an ingredient in 'Panch phoran’ - a roughly equal mix of methi/kalongi/jeera/saufn/sarson (kenugreek/nigella/cumin/fennel/black mustard) fried whole for veg and dal dishes. Also always liked it as a garden plant “love in a mist”/“devil in a bush” although this seems largely comprised of other Nigella species - damascena and others there is no problem growing this that I can see; it just as pretty so it probably crops up but maybe slightly less showy - I think I have tried planting everything out of the spice cupboard at some. Probably stick some in a pot and see although I will probably go down the asian supermarket area for fresh seed when I next stock up next. I am interest in this area but wasn’t very aware of it’s medical use off the top of my head; too much to keep up with - the research so far looks to show some potentials. Appears this is sometimes know as black cumin although that confuses it with ‘kala jeera’/black cumin of Indian cooking which at least looks a bit like true cumin.
"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law"
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#6
I've only munched on the seeds before, never used oil. When my kratom runs low I intend to start munching them again, which was recommended to me years ago to help with quitting.
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#7
New and dare I suggest interesting report on this here.
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