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15 people hospitalised, 2 dead at UK Festival
#1
Popped up on reddit

https://old.reddit.com/r/Drugs/comments/..._festival/

Quote:Recently 15 people have been hospitalised at a festival held in Portsmouth, which caused the Sunday to be cancelled.

No drug testing was available Water was priced at 2.50-3.50 with no source of free water for 3-5 hours even though temperatures were 25 degrees Celsius + with thousands of people crammed into non breathable tents

What were the organisers expecting ? I am fed up of every single festival I go to people are dying and the government are doing absolutely fuck all apart from scaremongering that there must be a dangerous batch of drugs are about. Then after this leaving everyone in the campsite with nothing to do which lead to more drug taking and so many more robberies.

There is no drug education in the uk; people regularly smash grams of Mandy down at festivals. But there is still nothing said until someone dies. Other festivals are starting to have drug testing kits given out (such as boomtown) but I believe this must be a mandatory thing for every single one.

TLDR : Is there anything I could do as a British citizen to get my country to sort it’s shit out and make sure people are safe ? This is too much of a common occurrence, it literally pains me that festival organisers and police just shrug their shoulders and say “huh, guess they shouldn’t have done drugs in the first place.”

News article will be posted in the comments for anyone interested

Edit : I don’t want the government to pay for the loop or such organisations, I’ll happily pay for it and I’m sure many others would too. I just want them to stop actively blocking these companies from working at festivals saying it will encourage drug use.

More here
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-44279321
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#2
Yeah, all of those thoughts from here too and sympathies to the families. I recall back in the day clubs would remove the faucet from taps to prevent the acquisition of free water. Don't have data about this event, but do we think excessive purity/dose or adulteration?  

From the post quoted and a thousand other pieces of evidence, surely it's time to accept that these situations of hedonism occur and that the only sensible option is to accommodate what since the dawn of history has been the case: human beings want to get their rocks off and have a good time, it's inevitable, and that ensuring that it happens in the safest environment possible isn't encouraging immoral lawbreaking, but rather is the only morally acceptable approach?
'The trouble is, we think we have time."
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#3
free water should be law, but law and financial interests are conflicted. Ministry of Sound wanted £110 for a day ticket to the Summer Sound System, once in I discovered they wanted £20 for an event listing - no other way of knowing when the acts were on. Cheapest drink: can of coke, £4. The place was full of cunts, I almost got into a fight with some chavs who came over to me just to mess with me - it was that level of 'we have come to mess with you' that is so deliberate and intolerable that being a victim or a fighter seem like the only options, but of course they fucked off the second I shoved one off. But some are looking for that. Who would've thought a massive bunch of cunts would attend a festival with day tickets at £110? The good news is that if you mature and grow a little wise you might read these signals and be smart enough to say 'you are obviously undesirables, and I do not wish to be involved with you - good day sir', or at least develop the skills after the fact. Thereby the attrocities remain as the makers or unmakers of men, creating worthy allies or assisting evolution in it's efforts.
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#4
read the story tired of these sort of happenings. my sympotjys go out to all of the family's friends and them to.
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